Federalist Papers – Essay #67

Essay #67, The Executive Department, is the first of eleven essays in which Alexander Hamilton defends the office of the Presidency as described in the proposed Constitution. He wastes no time getting right to the point: “There is hardly any part of the system which could have been attended with greater difficulty in the arrangement […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #66

In Essay #66, the final essay focusing on the Senate and titled, Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered, Alexander Hamilton takes aim at four objections raised against the powers granted to the Senate as a court for the trial of impeachment. The provision “confounds legislative […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #65

In Essay #65, The Powers of the Senate, Alexander Hamilton defends the use of the Senate as a court of impeachment for public officials impeached by the House of Representatives. Of all the options available under the Constitution, Hamilton argues, the Senate is the most appropriate to serve in such a serious capacity. He dismisses […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #64

In Essay #64, The Powers of the Senate, John Jay addresses the issue of the President being able to make treaties with the consent of two-thirds of the senate. Remember that John Jay was the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. These two bodies were appropriate for making foreign policy […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #63

In Essay #63, The Senate, James Madison focuses on the importance of the Senate as a critical and stabilizing element in the democratic republic established by the Constitution. Madison argues that the utility of a Senate is the “want of a due sense of national character.” A strong and perceptive Senate, as envisioned, would ensure […]

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