Federalist Papers – Essay #81

In Essay #81, The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority, Alexander Hamilton describes the separation of judicial authority among the different types of courts and the relationship between these courts. Article 3, Section 1, of the Constitution states, “The judicial power of the United States is to be vested in one supreme […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #80

In Essay #80, The Powers of the Judiciary, Alexander Hamilton presents five principles of judicial authority and then shows how the proposed Constitution conforms to them. He describes the six kinds of cases over which there should be jurisdiction: Cases that relate to federallaws, Cases that relate to the USConstitution, Cases that involve the USgovernment […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #79

In Essay #79, The Judiciary Department Continued, Alexander Hamilton aims at reassuring people that age is not a factor in the judiciary and that appropriate compensation for judges – in addition to lifetime appointments – will diminish the possibility of corruption and/or abuse. Specifically, he writes: “NEXT to permanency in office, nothing can contribute more […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #78

In Essay #78,The Judiciary Department, Alexander Hamilton extends his arguments for constitutional ratification by addressing the purpose and powers of the Judiciary including life appointments. It must be pointed out the Constitution does not explicitly give the Supreme Court the power to declare a law enacted by Congress and signed by the President as unconstitutional, […]

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Federalist Papers – Essay #76

In Essay #76, The Appointing Power of the Executive, Alexander Hamilton defends the power of the President to appoint public officials with the advice and consent of the senate. Hamilton argues that there are three ways appointments could be made By a single man (might result in favoritism and corruption clouding the selection of officers); […]

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